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SPOTLIGHT: Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) is on the move

SPOTLIGHT: Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) is on the move

MARCH 2022

Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI), also known as “bird flu,” is a serious, highly contagious disease that is often fatal to chickens and turkeys.

The year 2015 was the last time poultry farmers dealt with this devastating viral disease, which resulted in culling entire flocks, loss of income, and an overwhelming toll on farmers’ and workers’ physical and mental health.

These viruses rarely affect humans. Most cases of bird flu infection in humans have likely resulted from contact with infected poultry or contaminated surfaces. So far, there is no evidence of human-to-human transmission. HPAI requires a rapid response to keep the virus from spreading between flocks and farms. The goal is to contain and eradicate the disease quickly, protecting our poultry industry, and in turn, the American consumer.

UMASH has prepared a toolkit to help poultry farmers enhance prevention with biosecurity protocols, identify the signs and symptoms of HPAI in birds, and stay connected to additional resources from USDA – APHIS and state departments of agriculture.

ACCESS THE HPAI TOOLKIT

Resources for Small and Backyard Flocks


HPAI TOOLKIT

UNDERSTAND AVIAN INFLUENZA

Be informed by learning the facts, and latest information on avian influenza outbreaks.

PRACTICE BIOSECURITY

Be prepared with a solid biosecurity plan to help prevent the spread and protect your flock.

MONITOR YOUR FLOCK’S HEALTH

Know the signs of disease and check your flock daily for signs of illness.

VIEW RESOURCES

Signs of disease:

  • Sudden death
  • lack of energy, appetite and coordination
  • purple discoloration and/or swelling of various body parts
  • diarrhea; nasal discharge; coughing
  • sneezing; reduced egg production and/or abnormal eggs.

Quarantine sick birds right away.

REPORT SICK BIRDS

Know the procedure for reporting sick birds in your state.

VIEW UPPER MIDWEST CONTACT INFO
  • Minnesota

    Minnesota Avian Influenza Hotline:
    1-833-454-0156
    Press 1
    to report a sick domestic bird. Press 2 to report a sick or dead wild bird. Press 3 for biosecurity and general poultry management questions. Press 4 for permitting and control areas. Press 5 for all other inquiries.

  • Iowa

    If producers suspect signs of HPAI in their flocks, they should contact their veterinarian immediately. Possible cases should also be reported to the Iowa Department of Agriculture at (515) 281-5305. Concerned residents both within and outside the areas affected by avian influenza are encouraged to use the Iowa Concern Hotline at 1-800-447-1985 if they have questions.

  • North Dakota

    All bird owners, whether commercial producers or backyard enthusiasts, should continue to practice good biosecurity, prevent contact between their birds and wild birds, and immediately report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to State/Federal officials, either through the state veterinarian at 701-328-2655 or your private veterinarian.

  • Michigan

    The following hotlines are available for reporting suspected HPAI infections.
    DOMESTIC BIRDS:
    800-292-3939 (daytime); 517-373-0440 (after-hours)
    WILD BIRDS:
    517-336-5030

  • Wisconsin

    To report a disease, contact the Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP) using one of the​ methods below to ensure the report will reach DATCP within the time limit:
    Phone: 608-224-4872, Mon-Fri, 7:45am-4:30pm
    Email: DATCPAnimalImports@wisconsin.gov
    Evenings & weekends: (800) 943-0003. Tell the duty officer you are reporting a potential animal disease.

RESOURCES BY ROLE:

Talking Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza with Jeff Bender

Professor Jeff Bender, UMASH Director, answers key questions about Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI), or bird flu, an extremely contagious viral illness that affects both wild birds and livestock, such as chickens and turkeys in this article published by the University of Minnesota School of Public Health.

 

For more information about HPAI:

OTHER RELATED RESOURCES: