Publications

  • Authors: Treadwell RJ, Keifer MC

    Washington State Journal of Public Health Practice. Spokane, Washington. 2012

    ABSTRACT:
    To identify work-related factors in large and small occupational health and rural clinics that may impact sustained utilization of a portable cholinesterase (ChE) monitoring kit within those settings.

    Primary interview data were collected in April and May of 2009 from three occupational medical clinics that offer ChE monitoring to pesticide handlers in eastern Washington State. Participants were identified by their involvement in the state ChE monitoring program and selected by size.

    Key informant responses to a setting-specific interview guide were recorded. The Normalization Process Model (NPM) was used to identify factors that may promote or inhibit successful normalization of the kit into routine clinical practice. Interview data was organized with opensource qualitative analysis software. Themes were identified and applied to specific dimensions of the NPM for analysis.

    Volume of blood samples, procedural efficiency, patient trust, limited staffing disruption, and effective communication between key players within the monitoring system were some identified work-related factors that may promote kit normalization in clinics. The NPM identified several work-related factors that may positively dispose a portable ChE kit to normalization in a clinical setting. Clinics both large and small may be able to use the NPM to determine how a new clinicbased intervention may positively or negatively affect the workload of its staff.

    READ ARTICLE

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  • Research-to-practice transition of a portable cholinesterase monitoring kit: how does it affect the work of clinics? Image
  • Research-to-practice transition of a portable cholinesterase monitoring kit: how does it affect the work of clinics?

  • Authors: Treadwell RJ, Keifer MC

    Washington State Journal of Public Health Practice. Spokane, Washington. 2012

    ABSTRACT:
    To identify work-related factors in large and small occupational health and rural clinics that may impact sustained utilization of a portable cholinesterase (ChE) monitoring kit within those settings.

    Primary interview data were collected in April and May of 2009 from three occupational medical clinics that offer ChE monitoring to pesticide handlers in eastern Washington State. Participants were identified by their involvement in the state ChE monitoring program and selected by size.

    Key informant responses to a setting-specific interview guide were recorded. The Normalization Process Model (NPM) was used to identify factors that may promote or inhibit successful normalization of the kit into routine clinical practice. Interview data was organized with opensource qualitative analysis software. Themes were identified and applied to specific dimensions of the NPM for analysis.

    Volume of blood samples, procedural efficiency, patient trust, limited staffing disruption, and effective communication between key players within the monitoring system were some identified work-related factors that may promote kit normalization in clinics. The NPM identified several work-related factors that may positively dispose a portable ChE kit to normalization in a clinical setting. Clinics both large and small may be able to use the NPM to determine how a new clinicbased intervention may positively or negatively affect the workload of its staff.

    READ ARTICLE

  • « Back to Database
  • Research-to-practice transition of a portable cholinesterase monitoring kit: how does it affect the work of clinics? Image
  • Research-to-practice transition of a portable cholinesterase monitoring kit: how does it affect the work of clinics?

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